Observations and Modeling Across Scales:

Symposium in Honor of Eric Wood
Princeton University, June 2-3, 2016


Welcome

An international scientific symposium on "Observations and Modeling Across Scales" will take place on June 2-3, 2016 at Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey.


The symposium honors the work of Prof. Eric F. Wood who has been at the forefront of advances in our understanding of the land surface hydrological cycle, spanning a 40 year career. The symposium will bring together scientists with expertise in observations (at all scales, including remote sensing), modeling, model-data assimilation, as well as practitioners, to take stock of the progress that has been made in the last 25 years, identify the major challenges that remain, and to discus ways forward towards exploiting the emerging technological opportunities to overcome these challenges. A special issue of the Hydrology and Earth Systems Sciences (HESS) journal has been organized to document the outcomes and research presented at the symposium.


Please find details of the registration, program, special issue, travel and accomodation via the links on this page.

Background

Land surface hydrologists study the exchanges of water and energy between the land and the atmosphere, as well as the movement of water within and over the land surface. These processes have immediate and significant impacts on the quality of life on earth. The ways in which the spatiotemporal variability of precipitation interacts with the spatial heterogeneity of soils, topography, vegetation, and the geomorphology of stream networks to produce variable fields of runoff and soil moisture is a question that impacts many areas of hydrologic research. These include flood and drought estimation, water resource management, climate change impact assessments, and water quality predictions. Land-atmosphere interactions also affect the linkages between land surface states such as soil moisture, soil temperature, snow pack and vegetation, and evaporative, thermal, momentum, and radiative fluxes, as well as transport through the atmospheric surface and boundary layers and the associated modulation of convection, clouds, and precipitation. These interactions operate over decision-relevant time scales, from the diurnal (weather) to seasonal and inter-annual (climate). Therefore, observing, understanding, and predicting the resulting hydrological cycle impacts is crucial for short-term hydro-meteorological forecasting, as well as hydro-climatological studies of hydrological extremes such as floods and droughts.


The tremendous increases in computational power, advances in observational capability through satellite remote sensing, use of new sensors and sensor networks, and the increasing recognition of regional and global teleconnections between local alteration as well as their impact elsewhere in the world have opened up a new set of research questions. The scientific and technological advances derived from these questions will motivate changes in hydrologic prediction capabilities for the betterment of societies in both the developed and developing world, which are sorely needed. With this in mind, this symposium will bring together scientists with expertise in observations (at all scales, including remote sensing), modeling, model-data assimilation, as well as practitioners, to take stock of the progress that has been made in the last 25 years, to identify the major challenges that remain, and to chart a path towards utilizing the emerging technological opportunities to overcome these challenges.


Acknowledgement

The symposium would like to acknowledge and appreciate support from the National Science Foundation, Princeton University's Environmental Engineering and Water Resources Program (Dept Civil and Environmental Engineering), School of Engineering and Applied Science, and Princeton Environmental Institute.